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Brian Herman Named VP for Research

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University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler announced today that Dr. Brian Herman will be the university’s next vice president for research. Herman will assume leadership of the university’s research enterprise on Jan. 1, 2013, subject to approval by the Board of Regents in December.

Herman comes to the university from the University of Texas (UT), where he has been serving as the Chancellor’s Health Fellow in Collaboration for the UT System and Special Assistant to the President for the UT Health Science Center for the past two years. He is a full professor of cellular and structural biology, receiving his doctorate from the University of Connecticut Health Science Center and postgraduate training from Harvard Medical School.

Herman is an internationally renowned researcher in the field of cell death and the applications of optical imaging technologies to the study of cellular, tissue, and organismal physiology and pathophysiology. He has received two NIH merit awards and served on multiple NIH and NSF study sections, including a four-year term on the NIH Cell, Development and Function-2 study section, two of which he served as chair. He has published over 450 papers, book chapters, and abstracts, edited 4 books, and trained 26 students and 27 postdoctoral fellows over his scientific career.

As the university’s chief research officer, Herman will be responsible for overseeing all aspects of research at the University of Minnesota’s five campuses, providing guidance and support to individual researchers and managing the university’s research enterprise. He will also be a member of the university’s senior leadership group.

Post by John Merritt

Originally published on Research @ the U of M.

Gold block M

Contributing Writer

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