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CTSI Grant Helps Amplify University Research

Scientist works in lab with a petri dish

The University of Minnesota’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) was recently awarded one of the two largest federal grants the University has ever received: $42.6 million in renewed funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences' Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program.

CTSA funding supports programs that help clinical and translational researchers and clinical research professionals across the University to accelerate their discoveries and collaborate with colleagues throughout the state to address health challenges and expand medical research.  

The previous CTSA award in 2011, totaling $51 million, funded more than 170 research projects and helped create six startup ventures: CoreBiome (pharmaceutics), Tychon Biosciences (immunotherapy), Embomedics (medical devices), Andarta Medical (biotechnology), MesoFlow (stem cell research), and Vigilant Diagnostics (diagnostics). As these technologies reach the market, Minnesotans gain access to advanced options in healthcare and a better quality of life.

Still more projects, like a diagnostic tool that will quickly and inexpensively diagnose bacterial infections, are in progress and will benefit from CTSA funding throughout the research process.

Learn more about the grant and its benefits for the University and state in the official press release.

Meher Khan

Meher Khan

Meher previously served as communications associate for the Office of the Vice President for Research. She now works in the U of M's Clinical and Translational Science Institute as a communications specialist.

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