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Extension Brings the U to Every Minnesota County

Greater Minnesota town

By Catherine Dehdashti

Over 65 percent of University of Minnesota Extension staff live and work in greater Minnesota. They engage individuals, organizations and communities to ask challenging questions, discover science-based answers, and make a difference. Together, we create a better world through healthy food, thriving youth, vibrant communities, cleaner water and stronger families.

University of Minnesota Extension faculty and collaborators conduct nearly 200 peer-reviewed research projects each year, in order to discover the science-based solutions that will result in practical education and engage Minnesotans in building a better future.

Extension receives funding from federal, state and county partners to identify needs, discover solutions and ensure better decisions. Donors and volunteers help us address today’s complex issues, supporting Extension’s mission through generous gifts and their time. They are joined by another one thousand Minnesotans who serve on Extension’s advisory boards and committees across the state.

Here is a sampling of recent Extension research.

Catherine Dehdashti is communications and PR manager in University of Minnesota Extension.

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Contributing Writer

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