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IRB Expands to Strengthen Human Research Protections

Amundsen Glass Panels

The University of Minnesota’s Institutional Review Board plays an important role in ensuring that clinical research projects make the welfare of human participants their top priority.

Recently, the IRB strengthened its capacity for protecting human research participants and upholding the ethical conduct of human research by expanding its membership’s size and range of expertise. The IRB, an integral part of the U’s Human Research Protection Program, now includes more than 80 members with expertise in areas like psychiatry, pediatrics and oncology. These members now sit on eight biomedical panels and two social-behavioral panels, up from the previous one biomedical panel and two social-behavioral panels.

The majority of IRB members are U of M faculty who have deep scientific and technical knowledge in their fields and are highly regarded by their peers. They also make a significant time commitment for the good of the research community. Under federal law, IRB panels are independent and do not answer to individuals, departments or units that rely on the IRB for the review of their research.

See the full list of current IRB members or read about recently retired IRB members.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer and public relations associate with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

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