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Leader in Research Administration Receives Field’s Top Honor

Gold Star Trophy

A longtime leader in research administration at the University of Minnesota has been recognized with her profession’s top honor.

Pamela Webb, associate vice president for research, received this year’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research Administration from the National Council of University Research Administrators. The award recognizes Webb’s significant contributions to the field of research administration, as well as the time, knowledge and service she has provided to NCURA itself.

Webb has been involved in research administration for 32 years, with responsibilities including pre-award and post-award non-financial sponsored project services, research compliance oversight, negotiation of facilities and administrative (F&A) rates, effort reporting, and export controls. She has also worked with technology transfer, conflict of interest, animal subject tracking systems, and human subject policy and procedure.

Brian Herman, Ph.D., the U’s vice president for research, lauded Webb’s contributions to her field in an article published in NCURA’s bimonthly magazine. He highlighted her leading role in implementing the Uniform Guidance at the U of M, along with the work she did with colleagues across many higher education institutions to help the research community better understand these guidelines.

“Over the course of her 30-year career, Pamela has made significant contributions to the field of research administration,” Herman said. “Sharing her knowledge and expertise, she continually strives to advance the field locally and nationally.”

Webb received the award today as part of NCURA’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. For more information, visit the NCURA awards page.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a communications specialist with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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