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Made in Minnesota: Celebrating University Innovators

Close-up view of lit up fiber optics

Innovation and discovery have always been a proud part of the university’s growing and rich entrepreneurial landscape. During Made in Minnesota: Celebrating University Innovators, which took place Dec. 11 at Northrop, 285 inventors received much-deserved recognition for their efforts to, as President Kaler put it, “confirm that higher education is a profoundly public good.”

Representing 14 colleges across the university system, the honorees earned a total of 141 patents and 316 licenses during fiscal years 2012-2014. The evening included remarks from U of M President Eric Kaler, VP for Research Brian Herman and a keynote from nationally recognized journalist and urbanist Greg Lindsay.

2014 also marked the inaugural presentation of the Innovation Awards—winners were nominated by their peers in three categories for their contributions at various stages in their careers and in the commercialization cycle.

Innovation Awards

Early Innovator: Kechun Zhang, College of Science and Engineering

Entrepreneurial Researcher: Daniel Voytas, College of Biological Sciences

Impact: Robert Vince, Academic Health Center

Gold block M

Contributing Writer

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