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New Federal Guidelines to Streamline Award Distribution

United States capitol

The University of Minnesota’s Office of Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA) and Sponsored Financial Reporting (SFR)/the Controller’s Office are leading an effort to update university policies, procedures, electronic systems and training to meet new federal guidelines.

The changes will comply with Uniform Guidance, established by the White House Office of Management and Budget in December 2013 to streamline the requirements for federal awards. The guidelines aim to cut back administrative burden and financial waste and will replace OMB circulars A-21, A-110 and A-133.

A Uniform Guidance steering committee and seven work groups will lead the university’s transition. The work groups cover the following categories: conflict of interest, costing, HR/effort, post-award, pre-award/subaward, property and purchasing.

For details on these groups and the national effort, visit the Uniform Guidance webpage. Contact Associate Vice President for Research Pamela Webb (pwebb@umn.edu) or Assistant Controller Sue Paulson (spaul@umn.edu) with questions.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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