Skip to Content

Picturing Research: Historical Labs and Equipment

Tate Labs, then and now

Over the years, the Tate Laboratory of Physics has been remodeled and improved to meet the University of Minnesota’s research and education needs. Left: Construction workers add a new addition to Tate in 1951. Right: Today, Tate is being remodeled to improve lab space, lecture halls and interior accessibility.

A new Plant Growth Research Facility. A Chemistry and Advanced Materials Science Building. Renovations for research and learning spaces in iconic Pillsbury Hall. These are a few of the building projects highlighted in the University of Minnesota’s recent capital request to the Minnesota Legislature.

If funded, these projects will be the latest additions to a long history of cutting-edge research infrastructure at the U of M. In the course of the University’s 165-year history, researchers have used a wide range of laboratories and research equipment in fields ranging from aerospace engineering to disease prevention to advance knowledge and make discoveries that improve our health and quality of life.

In the gallery below, Inquiry takes a walk back through the research spaces of yore to highlight a small slice of the specialized equipment and laboratories that helped University researchers push forward in their fields of study.

 

Modern-day Tate Laboratory of Physics photo credit: Patrick O’Leary

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

Latest Blog Posts

Collage showing a vaccine, a young male using a pipette in a lab, a microscopic view of a coronavirus, and people conducting field research in a pond

University of Minnesota researchers successfully competed for a record amount of external funding last year, pushing past the $1 billion mark for the first time in the University’s history.

Read More
Categories:
Graphic reading: Grant-in-Aid

The Grant-in-Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship Program supports scholarly and artistic activities of faculty to foster excellence throughout UMN.

Read More
Categories:
Pennycress growing in a field

Through a combination of basic and applied science, researchers are bringing growers an economically feasible way to better protect soil and water.

Read More
Senior woman picking vegetables in garden

Research suggests nature has placed constraints on how much the underlying rate of aging can be slowed, even as nutrition and public health improve.

Read More