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Resuming On-Site Research During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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As part of the University of Minnesota’s Sunrise Plan to resume some operations while maintaining a safe work environment for the University community, some researchers can now receive approval to return to on-campus locations.

The new COVID-19 Guidance for the Research Community page outlines who is eligible to conduct research on-site and the steps those researchers need to follow to do so. The purpose of the plan is to strike a balance between easing restrictions to allow for research activity to resume while also implementing safety measures that keep viral transmission to a minimum.

For now, only research groups that cannot conduct their research remotely may return to their labs. Those who were deemed “Essential On-Campus” employees or who had already been approved to conduct essential research on-site do not need to seek additional approval through the Sunrise Plan process.

Anyone who falls within a group considered to be particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 (such as those with diabetes, an impaired immune system, or similar underlying conditions) are strongly encouraged to continue working from home.

To request to return to on-site work, follow the Steps for Research Resumption.

Note that certain situations—such as another statewide stay-at-home order, a spike in the rate of COVID-19 infections, or new information on how the coronavirus spreads—may require the University to quickly ramp-down research again in the future.

For previous COVID-19 research guidance, visit the Research Resources & Communications page.

For more about the Sunrise Plan overall, check the Sunrise Plan FAQs and the Faculty and Staff FAQs.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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