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Startup May Save Victims of Blood Loss and Trauma

paramedics

A new technology from the University of Minnesota has resulted in a startup that may help prolong the lives of victims suffering from massive blood loss or trauma. The Office for Technology Commercialization has signed a license agreement with Denver-based Ariel Pharmaceuticals authorizing the private company to develop and commercialize the therapy.

Researchers at the Twin Cities and Duluth campuses — including surgeon Gregory Beilman, biologist Matthew Andrews and biomedical scientist Lester Drewes — designed a low-volume resuscitation fluid that may increase the survival rates of people who would otherwise die from hemorrhagic shock. They developed the therapy, called Tamiasyn, based on their studies of the biological process of hibernation in ground squirrels (gophers).

The technology could offer first responders, emergency department staff and military medics a simple, safe and reliable product that prevents life-threatening complications due to severe blood loss. At the same time, it could help prevent organ damage during resuscitation.

Originally published on Business @ the U of M.

Gold block M

Contributing Writer

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