Skip to Content

Startup May Save Victims of Blood Loss and Trauma

paramedics

A new technology from the University of Minnesota has resulted in a startup that may help prolong the lives of victims suffering from massive blood loss or trauma. The Office for Technology Commercialization has signed a license agreement with Denver-based Ariel Pharmaceuticals authorizing the private company to develop and commercialize the therapy.

Researchers at the Twin Cities and Duluth campuses — including surgeon Gregory Beilman, biologist Matthew Andrews and biomedical scientist Lester Drewes — designed a low-volume resuscitation fluid that may increase the survival rates of people who would otherwise die from hemorrhagic shock. They developed the therapy, called Tamiasyn, based on their studies of the biological process of hibernation in ground squirrels (gophers).

The technology could offer first responders, emergency department staff and military medics a simple, safe and reliable product that prevents life-threatening complications due to severe blood loss. At the same time, it could help prevent organ damage during resuscitation.

Originally published on Business @ the U of M.

Gold block M

Contributing Writer

Latest Blog Posts

View of Washington Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis with downtown skyline in the background

Launch Minnesota aims to grow the startup ecosystem by connecting entrepreneurs with resources and education to help them bring new technologies to market.

Read More
Football players gathered at the line of scrimmage, about to start a play

Research into how neurons become damaged sets the stage for drugs or other treatments that could limit or prevent long-term harm following a concussion.

Read More
Waves in water

A recently launched online platform aims to help researchers from across the University system connect around water-related discussions and research.

Read More
Jimmy Randolph

Darcy Solutions' systems provide greater heating and cooling capacity using less above-ground space, making them easier to install in existing buildings.

Read More