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Tech Transfer Brings Cutting-Edge Research to Market

Illustration of a globe with multicolored panels

Jian-Ping Wang, a prolific inventor and University of Minnesota engineering professor, has used his knowledge of nanomagnetics and spintronics to develop a system that detects the biological calling cards of diseases like HIV and cancer.

Nikos Papanikolopoulos, computer science and engineering professor, built a reconnaissance robot that could save lives by surveying hostile territory before soldiers or law enforcement enter the fray.

With help from the U’s Office for Technology Commercialization, Wang, Papanikolopoulos and other dedicated U researchers are moving their inventions from the lab to the market. Check out a recent story in the National Journal to learn how OTC’s business-savvy staff guide researchers in disclosing their inventions and starting companies around new technology.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a communications specialist with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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