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U Invests $4 Million in Research Infrastructure

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The University of Minnesota’s Office of the Vice President for Research has announced the recipients of its 2015 Research Infrastructure Investment Program, which helps maintain the robust, state-of-the art equipment key to propelling research and innovation.

The awards, which totaled over $2 million from OVPR and were matched one-to-one by funds from the supporting colleges or centers, are a one-time investment in university research infrastructure designed to ensure crucial research facilities and support services on all campuses are viable and up-to-date for cutting-edge research. The program, which impacts researchers in at least five colleges and 12 centers and institutes, supports transdisciplinary research and encourages collaboration across the U’s colleges and campuses.

Thirteen proposals were chosen for funding, ranging from a new 3D bioprinting facility that uses living tissue to create transplantable organs to an expansion of the Multisensory Perception Laboratory, where researchers can measure audio-visual perception in a variety of simulated environments.

Visit Research Advancement to learn more about the projects selected.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer and public relations associate with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

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