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U Named Udall Center of Excellence in Parkinson’s Research

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University of Minnesota researchers have received a major grant that will amplify efforts to develop new treatments for complex and debilitating brain disorders.

Today, the University was named a Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research by the National Institutes of Health. The designation provides $9.07 million over the next five years to establish a Udall Center at the University and fund multidisciplinary research that aims to reveal the fundamental causes of Parkinson’s and improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with the disease. With its new designation, the U of M joins nine other centers at research institutions across the country.

Jerrold Vitek, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of the University’s Department of Neurology, will lead the Udall Center. His team will collaborate with world-class researchers from across the globe, bringing together some of the brightest minds in Parkinson’s research.

The Minnesota Legislature’s ongoing investment in MnDRIVE research helped set the stage for the Udall Center. Over the past two years, MnDRIVE Brain Conditions researchers have explored new and improved therapies for Parkinson’s and other brain-based movement disorders using cutting-edge deep brain stimulation techniques. These research efforts will expand and continue through the Udall Center. In addition to Vitek, a MnDRIVE steering committee member, scholars and post-doctoral fellows from the program will also join the newly established Udall Center.

Watch this video of University leaders discussing the impact of the Udall Center designation.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a communications specialist with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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