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U Research Infrastructure Awarded $2.5 Million

Scientists in a laboratory

The University of Minnesota’s Office of the Vice President for Research has announced the recipients of its 2017 Research Infrastructure Investment Program. Projects were chosen for their support of transdisciplinary research and encouragement of collaboration across the U’s colleges and campuses.

The awards totaled over $2.5 million from OVPR and one-to-one matching funds from the supporting colleges or centers. The 13 projects that received funding this year will impact researchers from two campuses, seven colleges, and 21 departments, units, and centers.

Supported projects include updated facilities for the University of Minnesota Zebrafish Core Facility within the Medical School's Department of Neuroscience, establishment of the Crookston Center for Collaborative Research, and other investments that are vital to the U of M's ability to conduct state-of-the-art research.

Learn more about this year’s award recipients.

Photo: iStock

Meher Khan

Meher Khan

Meher previously served as communications associate for the Office of the Vice President for Research. She now works in the U of M's Clinical and Translational Science Institute as a communications specialist.

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