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U Research Infrastructure Gets $2.4 Million Boost

driven to discover building

The University of Minnesota’s Office of the Vice President for Research has announced the recipients of its 2016 Research Infrastructure Investment Program, which helps maintain the robust, state-of-the art equipment key to propelling research and innovation.

The awards, which totaled over $1.2 million from OVPR and were matched one-to-one by funds from supporting colleges, centers and external partners, are a one-time investment in university research infrastructure designed to ensure that crucial research facilities and support services on all campuses are viable and up-to-date for cutting-edge research. The program supports transdisciplinary research and encourages collaboration across the U’s colleges and campuses.

Eleven proposals were chosen for funding, which range from expanding the presence and research capacity of the Driven to Discover building at the Minnesota State Fair to acquiring a machine that tests the quality of asphalt mixtures and determines how well they hold up against wear and tear. The selected proposals impact researchers in at least nine colleges and eight centers and institutes across the University system.

Photo credit: Pat O’Leary

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

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