Skip to Content

U Startup Andamio Designs Educational Biology Game

students with tablets

Students will soon have a more interactive and engaging way to learn the fundamentals of cell biology.

University of Minnesota startup Andamio Games has partnered with Sehoya Cotner, Ph.D., professor with the College of Biological Sciences, and Barbara Billington, Ph.D., professor of STEM education with the College of Education and Human Development, to develop a tablet-based educational game to teach the concepts of cell respiration and photosynthesis. The project, funded by a $150,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, will conduct pilot tests of the game at classrooms this summer and ultimately provide the game to schools across the country free of charge.

Andamio Games, launched in summer 2015 and based in Minneapolis, creates interactive games that help educators in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields teach core concepts to students through individualized learning and collaborative problem solving.

The company’s first game was iNeuron, developed by Janet Dubinsky, Ph.D., neuroscience professor with the U’s Medical School, to make brain science more accessible. Both K-12 classrooms and the general public have used the game to increase understanding of normal nervous system functions, along with drug interactions, mental health and neurological disorders.

See the CBS blog article for more on Andamio’s upcoming educational biology game.

Over the past two years, the University’s Office for Technology Commercialization has licensed three separate research programs into app-based startup companies, translating the programs into products and services while creating jobs in the regional economy.

Kevin Coss

Kevin Coss

Kevin is a writer with the Office of the Vice President for Research.

coss@umn.edu

Latest Blog Posts

Oak tree in a sunny field

Hyperspectral imaging may provide a quicker and more accurate way to detect trees infected with oak wilt and inform efforts to stanch the disease's spread.

Read More
Adults sitting wearing traditional costumes and children wearing school uniforms

A sizable gap in indigenous language fluency and traditional practices has opened up between teenage students and their parents in Papua New Guinea.

Read More
Multitude of blue butterflies with a single orange butterfly atop them

Through nearly $15 million in Templeton Foundation funding, a new international cohort program led by a UMN philosophy researcher aims to explore purposive-looking behavior in living systems.

Read More
Graphic reading Innovation Impact Case Award

The new Innovation Impact Case Award celebrates work that solves challenges and benefits individuals, organizations, and communities.

Read More
Categories: