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VP Herman on the Innovation Deficit

brian herman

Last week, MinnPost published an Op Ed by University of Minnesota Vice President for Research, Dr. Brian Herman, regarding the nation’s “innovation deficit”—and the impacts being felt here in Minnesota.

Herman was responding to an open letter to President Obama and Congress, signed by U of M President Eric Kaler and U of M Duluth Chancellor Lendley Black, urging policymakers to address declining federal investments in research and higher education.

“Eroding federal investments in research and higher education and sequestration cuts, combined with the enormous resources other countries are pouring into innovation and discovery, are creating the deficit,” said Herman.

Herman cites the U of M’s long track record of groundbreaking discoveries and innovation that have led to life-saving treatments, improved the quality of life in our communities and contributed significantly to our state’s economy.

And while the U of M’s ongoing partnerships with the private, nonprofit and public sector put us in a strong position to continue that tradition, Herman cautions that “this alone will not sustain Minnesota’s leadership. A long-term commitment to federal investment also is necessary.”

Originally published on Research @ the U of M.

Erin Dennis

Erin Dennis

Erin is assistant communications director for the Office of the Vice President for Research and senior editor of Inquiry. 

edennis@umn.edu

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